El Dorado Ark Police Officer Dances & Sings Photos & Video

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El Dorado Ark Police Officer Dances & Sing With Children Choir from Southeast Arkansas Weather on Vimeo.

 

 

Step in the name of love

A El Dorado Ark Police Officer went to play some basketball with some children in El Dorado Arkansas at the Boys and Girls Club and then they sung a song in title “How Great Is Our God”

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El Dorado Ark Police Officer Dances & Sings Photos & Video

[jwplayer MomP0Iwx]

 

[jwplayer Qs2a02Tv]

 


El Dorado Ark Police Officer Dances & Sing With Children Choir from Southeast Arkansas Weather on Vimeo.

 

 

Step in the name of love

A El Dorado Ark Police Officer went to play some basketball with some children in El Dorado Arkansas at the Boys and Girls Club and then they sung a song in title “How Great Is Our God”

DING DONG DAYS – 2016

Ding Dong Days bannerMark your calendars for the upcoming annual “Ding Dong Days – 2016” city festival slated for September 27th through October 1st, 2016 in Dumas, Arkansas. Many fun and entertaining events are scheduled this year such as class reunions, BBQ cook-off, 5K walk/run, car show, concerts, concessions and other fun activities. Email Womens Service League for Registration and ticket information: wsldumas@gmail.com

Officer Impersonator Reported In Union County & Ouachita County Ark

BREAKING NEWS:
A Be On The Look Out, or BOLO, was issued by Union County and Ouachita County Sheriff Departments on July 23 regarding a man impersonating a law enforcement officer.
A Caucasian male described as “clean-cut” is reported to be driving an unmarked white car with red and white dash lights on it. The unidentified man is dressed as an officer – complete with a badge – and is armed. He has reportedly pulled over a woman in Union County and assaulted her at gunpoint.
If a person in a car that appears to belong to a law enforcement entity turns on the vehicle’s flashing lights and you are unsure about the car or officer, do not pull over. Call 911. You should slow down (to indicate you are not trying to get away, in case it is a real police officer), signal your intent to pull over – but only do so when you can find a well-lit, public place with other people around, such as a shopping mall parking lot or at the closest police station.

Officer Impersonator Reported In Union County & Ouachita County Ark

BREAKING NEWS:
A Be On The Look Out, or BOLO, was issued by Union County and Ouachita County Sheriff Departments on July 23 regarding a man impersonating a law enforcement officer.
A Caucasian male described as “clean-cut” is reported to be driving an unmarked white car with red and white dash lights on it. The unidentified man is dressed as an officer – complete with a badge – and is armed. He has reportedly pulled over a woman in Union County and assaulted her at gunpoint.
If a person in a car that appears to belong to a law enforcement entity turns on the vehicle’s flashing lights and you are unsure about the car or officer, do not pull over. Call 911. You should slow down (to indicate you are not trying to get away, in case it is a real police officer), signal your intent to pull over – but only do so when you can find a well-lit, public place with other people around, such as a shopping mall parking lot or at the closest police station.

Officer Impersonator Reported In Union County & Ouachita County Ark

BREAKING NEWS:
A Be On The Look Out, or BOLO, was issued by Union County and Ouachita County Sheriff Departments on July 23 regarding a man impersonating a law enforcement officer.
A Caucasian male described as “clean-cut” is reported to be driving an unmarked white car with red and white dash lights on it. The unidentified man is dressed as an officer – complete with a badge – and is armed. He has reportedly pulled over a woman in Union County and assaulted her at gunpoint.
If a person in a car that appears to belong to a law enforcement entity turns on the vehicle’s flashing lights and you are unsure about the car or officer, do not pull over. Call 911. You should slow down (to indicate you are not trying to get away, in case it is a real police officer), signal your intent to pull over – but only do so when you can find a well-lit, public place with other people around, such as a shopping mall parking lot or at the closest police station.

Fatal Wreck On HWY 138 In Drew County Ark

Screenshot courtesy of Arkansas State Police Fatal Crash Report

Screenshot courtesy of Arkansas State Police Fatal Crash Report

 

Zach Jones Memorial Fund

 

 

Around 5:40 a.m a Star City man has died from injuries he sustained when a vehicle struck him on HWY 138 E, early Monday morning. Zachery Jones of Star City Ark and a co-worker were going to work on Winchester Road near the old Pine Hill area. When his toolbox fell out of his truck. They turned around and parked in the middle of the road (with lights on) and began to pick up the tools. As Jones was near the shoulder picking up his tools and approaching westbound vehicle in an attempt to avoid the pickup truck moved over to the shoulder striking him.Jones was pronounced dead at the scene by the Drew County coroner.The accident is being investigated by the Drew County sheriffs department and the Arkansas State Police.

 

Releated:

Deputies: Man Killed while Picking Up Spilled Tools on Highway

1 Child Injured In Fire On Peach St. In Dumas Ark On May 26th

1 child was severely burned from falling into a fire pit on Peach Street in Dumas Ark on May 16th 2016.Photos courtesy of a Dumas Ark
Police Officer

 

These boys put a smile on my face today and i hope i made there’s Malachi James was burned severely in a fire by gods grace this little fella is able to still put his uniform on and help me arrest bad guys Malachi James I Pray that god heals u day by day my friend u made my day and don’t even know it!!

Monticello Ark Mayor Weekly Message July 23rd – Video

In recent weeks, a group of area residents calling themselves “Monticello Citizens for Better Government” have taken the charge to circulate several petitions to repeal our city’s only avenue to help keep our city clean, enact some new proposals, and to recall me from of office of mayor.

I have avoided a response to these individuals efforts to date, allowing the opportunity for me to get a better understanding of the issues. Last week, I sent an open letter to the organizers, encouraging them that the city, and myself, value any concerns that any resident may have. I reminded them that city hall is alway open, and requested the opportunity for these individuals to have an open conversation about their concerns, and an opportunity for the city to address their concerns directly. As we would anyone’s concerns.

I have always welcomed Monticellonians to bring their concerns to me about our city and community. In my time as mayor, I have received reports of concerns from citizens in the form of formal letters, emails, and person conversations in the bread aisle of the grocery. I even often answer three to four questions, or concerns, a week via private Facebook messages. To date, I have heard no word from these individuals about working with city government to address their concerns. 
In my open letter, I reiterate the fact that, from what I can gather from media coverage, several proposals of their proposals, at face value, I could possibly be supportive of; and in that event, I would be willing to work with City Council on these proposals.
In an public effort of good faith, I would like to follow-up on this comment; and put action to my words. Two of the concerns, that seem to be presented by these individuals, are non-partisan election of municipal officials and public commentary at City Council meetings.
As one of my first acts in office, I issued the city’s first Open Government Directive. The directive established new principles to help guide city government’s actions intended to commit to transparency, meaningful public participation, and collaborating with the public and other governments.
In addition to providing a city website where meeting agendas, ordinances, etc. are published and are open to the public a week in advance of meetings, reporting weekly to the public on municipal issues, and requiring for the first time a public forum period at government meetings.
The policies adopted around public commentary at public meetings, were never intended to limit public comments, but be a requiring period, for the first time, promised to the public for their time in front of the City Council. Anyone who wished to address the Monticello City Council on an item can either request to be placed on the agenda one week in advance of the meeting, or can request to speak during a public hearing period at the end of the meeting.
To show that the intent of the rules was not to limit debate, I have signed a mayoral directive amending the rule allowing residents to request to speak on an agenda item at the time the issue is being considered during the meeting. Before City Council discussion and a vote, residents may request to speak before the meeting is called to order to speak for three minutes on that agenda item. An open public hearing period, for residents to speak on issues not on the agenda, will still remain at the ending business. 
Secondly, I am in agreeance with the proposal to make municipal officials nonpartisan (as opposed to requiring them to file Democrat and Republican). Although I am an active democrat, there is nothing Democrat or Republican about running a city. Fixing potholes, developing parks, or providing clean water are not partisan issues, they are city issues. The Arkansas Municipal League reports, Monticello is one of only eight first class cities that still has partisan elections. Arkansas law allows the City Council to move to nonpartisan elections within a timeline. I pledge to work with the City Council to develop a proposal to move toward nonpartisan elections. This would not affect this November’s general election, but can change the process for the 2018 general election.
Our town can’t afford to have the politics of the national stage, where people with different ideas won’t even sit in the same room with each other. Our city is too important. The challenges that face us in the 21st Century are too complex for us to be divided as a community. We must work and collaborate together if we are to address these challenges. We must welcome diverse ideas and blend them with others to develop more powerful compromises that improve our city, and continue our forward thinking.